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Philosophy Bakes Bread, Radio Show & Podcast

Philosophy Bakes Bread, "food for thought about life and leadership," is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA), which airs first on WRFL Lexington, 88.1 FM, is subsequently released as a podcast. Philosophy Bakes Bread aims to showcase the public importance of philosophy, both for our everyday lives and for leadership in the policy world. Co-hosts Dr. Eric Thomas Weber and Dr. Anthony Cashio speak with guests each Monday at 2pm Eastern, with episodes to subscribe to or download within a few days later. The show originated with inspiration from a talk that Weber gave in receiving the Mississippi Humanities Council's 2015 Public Scholar Award. He then created a pilot podcast, posting four episodes between then and 2016. In 2017, WRFL welcomed Weber and Cashio's proposal for a SOPHIA sponsored program. For more information, visit http://PhilosophyBakesBread.com and get to know SOPHIA at http://PhilosophersInAmerica.com.
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Now displaying: June, 2017
Jun 30, 2017

This twenty-third episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast is a special edition of the show that we call a "breadcrumb." A Breadcrumb is a short, 8-20 minute episode that was cut off from a longer show, that's a collage of little clips, or that is a response to listener feedback. Today's breadcrumb episode features Dr. Mariana Alessandri of the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, talking with us again, about the bread baking metaphor for philosophy, how apt it is, but for surprising reasons. Bread is useful, but very few people today bake it themselves.

Dr. Alessandri was with us on episode 22 of the show, "The Little Engine that Couldn't." If you haven't heard it yet, listening to this one first, check them both out, as well as episode 24, out next, which is a second breadcrumb episode that we recorded as well. 

As always, you can reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

Jun 29, 2017

In this twenty-second episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Eric Thomas Weber and Dr. Anthony Cashio interview Dr. Mariana Alessandri of the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (UTRGV) on the topic of "The Little Engine that Couldn't."

Dr. Alessandri is an assistant professor of philosophy at UTRGV. She has published in The New York TimesTimes Higher Education, as well as in academic journals. She recently published a piece related to this episode in The New York Times, titled "In Praise of Lost Causes." 

This episode of Philosophy Bakes Bread is followed by not one, but two "breadcrumb" episodes. The first one coming out is a follow-up conversation that we had on the bread-baking metaphor. The second is about what we should tell our kids if we adopt Dr. Alessandri's quixotic pessimism as our outlook. Be sure to check those out when they come out, soon after this episode is released.

 Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

Jun 24, 2017

This twenty-first episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast is a special edition of the show that we call a "breadcrumb." A Breadcrumb is a short, 8-20 minute episode that was cut off from a longer show, that's a collage of little clips, or, as in this case, that is a response to listener feedback. Today's breadcrumb episode is a bigger version of what in the past we called a "You Tell Me!" segment.

In this second breadcrumb, Dr. Eric Thomas Weber and Dr. Anthony Cashio invited Dr. Danielle Lake back on the show. Danielle was first interviewed in Episode 12 of the show, which we called "That's a Wicked Problem You've Got There." Recall that Dr. Lake is assistant professor in the department of Liberal Studies at Grand Valley State University, with her Ph.D. in Philosophy. In 2016, she was honored with the John Lachs Award for Public Philosophy from the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy. She is the author of Institutions and Process: Problems of Today, Misguided Answers from Yesterday (2008), in addition to many journal articles. 

As always, you can reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

Jun 22, 2017

In this twentieth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Eric Thomas Weber and Dr. Anthony Cashio interview Chris Tatem, a Clerk of Courts in Wyoming and the host of the Cross Examined Life podcast

Chris has always been interested in philosophical questions. Early on, he asked his teachers and parents endless questions. At an early age, he wrote Socratic dialogues, before he went on to study under a professor who was his inspiration for that kind of writing. He continued on into work in the justice system. His undergraduate studies in Philosophy inspire him daily, he explains. His inspiration for creating the Cross Examined Life podcast stem from that love of philosophy, connected with the inspiration he gains from watching talented attorneys engage in cross examination in court rooms. 

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

Jun 14, 2017

In this nineteenth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Anthony Cashio and Dr. Eric Thomas Weber interview Dr. Martha Nussbaum of the University of Chicago on the topic of "Anger and Forgiveness," the subject of her recent book by that name, which is available both as a printed book and as an audio book. Dr. Nussbaum has been named one of the most influential living philosophers. She was the recipient of the 2016 Kyoto Prize, and then, in 2017, gave the Jefferson Lecture, the highest honor that the U.S. government can bestow in the humanities. The video of her lecture is available online here.

Dr. Nussbaum has written many books and is known especially for the "capabilities approach" to human development, such as in her 2000 book, Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach, and later in Frontiers of Justice: Disability, Nationality, Species Membership (2006), as well as Creating Capabilities: The Human Development Approach, released in 2011. Dr. Nussbaum is also known for her work on emotions, such as in Political Emotions: Why Love Matters for Justice, as well as on higher education, as in Not for Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

Jun 5, 2017

In this eighteenth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Anthony Cashio and Dr. Eric Thomas Weber interview Dr. Chris Long of Michigan State University on the topic of "Creating Community through Dialogue." Chris is a co-founder of The Public Philosophy Journal and is Dean of the College of Arts and Letters at Michigan State.

Dr. Long's research has focused on Ancient Greek and Contemporary Continental Philosophy, as in his three books: The Ethics of Ontology: Rethinking an Aristotelian Legacy (SUNY 2004), Aristotle On the Nature of Truth (Cambridge 2010), and an enhanced digital book entitled, Socratic and Platonic Political Philosophy: Practicing a Politics of Reading (Cambridge 2014). The digital platform of the enhanced digital book enables readers to engage directly with the author in an online community.

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

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